GPS Doesn’t Mean Guaranteed to Put you in the right Spot (sorry)

So a few things I learned about GPS on the train and when I got to Seattle. First, I left my trusty Garmin Nuvi at home, thinking I would rely on the GPS I expected to have in the car I would drive, plus the two (count ‘em, two) GPS systems in my Android phone.

First the good news and bad news on the train. Here’s the good news: the Google Navigation system kept up with the moving train and the satellite image option let me see the terrain surrounding the rails — a neat feature. Sprint also kept up, but didn’t have the satellite photo feature. Google kept trying to put the train on a street, so the route jumped around a bit, but overall did a good job.

The bad news made me miss the Garmin unit, as it has a readout of the speed you’re traveling. When I took Amtrak over to Santa Fe, NM, last year, it was really cool to sit in my little roomette in the middle of the night, watching the stars go by, and having this little gizmo tell me the train was traveling at 90mph.

Arriving in Seattle at around 10 p.m. (the Starlight was right on time), I thought I’d walk from the King Street Station the couple of blocks to my hotel. I programmed in the address to Google Navigation (just selecting the address on Google Maps put it in the GPS) and followed the directions. Unfortunately, a three-block walk turned into a six block wander, as the direct way was on one-way streets going toward me. If I’d been in a car, it would have looped me around correctly, but there’s no “walking” selection, so I sort of found it on my own.

The next day was bright and clear, of course a rarity in Seattle. More on that next time.

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